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Finding time to keep turning the page

Finding time to keep turning the page

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Despite my best intentions, it has been a long time since I have read a good book.

I have no problem finding a book that sounds interesting and starting the book. The problem is, actually finishing a book. I tend to read about half of my new novel of choice and then put it aside to attend to other demands. By the time I go back to the book, I have forgotten some of the details and face an aggravating decision. I either have to restart the book or give up all together. Does anyone else run into this problem?

When I was in elementary and junior high school, I had a passion to read. I seemed to always have a book in my hands and was fascinated by the worlds and locations that leaped off the page and became so very real in my imagination.

As I grew older, the types of books I read evolved. I went from reading fun children’s books to reading biographies of famous people of the past. Much in the same way I like movies based on true stories, I was fascinated in the details of the lives of these actual people. I remember a stretch where I read biographies on people of the Old West like Wyatt Earp and Crazy Horse. The allure of that era combined with the rough and tumble lifestyle of those people taming the frontier seemed so far removed from the world I knew that I was transfixed.

I also devoured the life stories of various athletes. Learning about their childhoods and how they rose to the top of their sport was inspiring. If I were to read a biography today, there is no question it would be on legendary Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder Roberto Clemente. A Hall of Fame player, Clemente died in a plane crash on New Year’s Eve 1972 while providing humanitarian aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua. I was too young to remember him as a player, but his statistics and the story of his death has always created a desire to learn more about this remarkable man.

In high school, my interests shifted from biographies to murder mysteries. This is still my preferred genre today.

Without question, my favorite author is Agatha Christie and my favorite character is her famed Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot. Some of the most famous books involving Poirot include “The A.B.C. Murders,” “Death on the Nile” and “Murder on the Orient Express.”

However, if you were to ask me what my favorite book of all time is, the answer would be easy. Yes, it is an Agatha Christie novel, but it is a stand along book entitled “And Then There Were None” but was also published as “10 Little Indians.”

The premise of the book is 10 people are invited to a secluded island for the weekend by either an unknown friend of a friend or an unknown employer. These strangers are confronted with dark secrets from their past and must determine who is killing the guests one by one if they hope to survive the weekend and escape the island. If you enjoy a good mystery with plenty of suspense and some amazing twists and turns, I highly recommend it.

My second favorite series is by author Troy Soos. Again this is series of murder mysteries with a very unique twist. The main character of the series is Mickey Rawlings, a journeyman utility infielder who plays baseball by day and serves as an amateur gumshoe by night.

Playing in a different Major League city each season between World War I and the Roaring Twenties, Rawlings becomes entangled in some controversy or conspiracy. Although the mysteries are not as complicated as those presented by Christie, Soos brings the time period to life with historically accurate descriptions of the cities and the events taking place in them. As an added bonus, Soos is a member of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR).As such, the details of the baseball games described in his books are accurate in terms of the dates, teams, scores and statistics presented.

There are seven books and one short story in the Mickey Rawlings series. I started the final book of the series, “The Tomb that Ruth Built,” more than a year ago, but I need to start over because I was lost the last time I picked up the book.

Regardless of what type of book you enjoy, reading is a great way to exercise your mind while exploring new locations and worlds without leaving the comfort of your home. I think I need to take a trip to New York and catch a Yankees games.

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